Efficiency potentials for lifts

Anyone who lives in a house with a lift knows the phenomenon: a fairly high sum is required every year for lift operating costs on the service charge bill. And that is the case given that the lift is at a standstill most of the time. Around half of the approximately 650,000 lifts in Germany are located in residential buildings, and more than 70% of their power consumption occurs during standby, i.e. when the lift isn't even running.1

On average, lifts are responsible for around 5% of the overall building energy requirement and therefore provide a good way to increase building energy efficiency and reduce operating costs.2

Lift cabin lighting

Lift cabin lighting is an initial way of reducing energy consumption. In many lifts, it is on around the clock irrespective of whether a passenger is in the lift not. This means that it causes more than one quarter of the standby power consumption.3 Two simple measures show that this is unnecessary:

  • The lighting can be switched off during lift standstill through the use of one additional component. Additionally, components not required can be switched off by the control system.
  • LED lighting can reduce power consumption with the lift lights switched on. Other lift components can also be replaced by more energy-efficient components.

Drives

Large saving potentials can also be realised for lifts with a high proportion of running time and therefore a comparably low proportion of overall standby power requirements. For example, this includes lifts in

  • • Office buildings (almost 25% of all lifts are found here4)
  • Hospitals
  • Retirement homes.

Drive technology is decisive here. It is often outdated and inefficient since the majority of German lifts were fitted in the 60s and the 70s.5 Installation of a modern drive, for example a transmission-less frequency and voltage variable drive with energy recovery can reduce energy consumption during operation by up to 80% compared to a conventional pole-changeable drive6.


1 Hirzel, S., Fleiter, T., Rosende, D., 2010: Elevators and escalators in Germany from an energy perspective, Fraunhofer ISI, URL: publica.fraunhofer.de/eprints/urn:nbn:de:0011-n-1331371.pdf [Stand: Mai 2012], S. 6, 17
2 Beier, C.: Analyse des Energieverbrauchs und exemplarische Best-practice-Lösungen für relevante Verbrauchssektoren in Krankenhäusern, Fraunhofer-Institut für Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT, DBU – AZ 23472, 2009, S. 47
3 Leurs, L.: Sinnvolle Modernisierungsmaßnahmen im Zusammenhang mit Energieeinsparpotentialen, Vortrag zum 2. Betreibertag 2010 der Niggemeier & Leurs GmbH, 25.06.2010
4 Hirzel, S., Fleiter, T., Rosende, D., 2010: Elevators and escalators in Germany from an energy perspective, Fraunhofer ISI, URL: publica.fraunhofer.de/eprints/urn:nbn:de:0011-n-1331371.pdf [Stand: Mai 2012], S. 6
5 Hirzel, S., Fleiter, T., Rosende, D., 2010: Elevators and escalators in Germany from an energy perspective, Fraunhofer ISI, URL: publica.fraunhofer.de/eprints/urn:nbn:de:0011-n-1331371.pdf [Stand: Mai 2012], S. 7
6 ENEA, 2010: Optimierung der Energieeffizienz bei Aufzügen, URL: www.e4project.eu/Documenti/WP6/E4-German%20Final%20Brochure.pdf [Stand: Mai 2012], S. 12

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